Archive for ‘malawi’


Season’s Greetings from Malawi

December 22nd, 2018

What a lovely and motivating message to get from our great friend and TT supporter on the ground in Malawi, Lynn Clifford of WAG.

Dear TT
Just a quick note to wish you all a very merry Christmas and Happy New Year.
Tuesday Trust has been partnering with WAG now for some years and I
have to thank you for all your support.
The projects we have been supporting have at times produced amazing
results and at other times have been extremely disappointing. However,
I think it is important to keep in mind that the situation here is
desperate, and in most cases its the cultural side which pulls down
the roof, so to say.
Child Education and woman empowerment are key, as these are the most
vulnerable of our society, and TT are doing great things on the
education front.
WAG in 2019 will be revising our education projects, in an attempt to
activate young people though video and more particle ways. More to
come on that.
The gardens have already been prepared and planted. This year we have
been more strict with very clear guidelines about garden size, fencing
planting etc. All schools have personally told me they love this
project and have made many mistakes and this year we will see many
changes. Let’s see.
The clinic has planted with the rains and already the soya and ground
nuts have germinated and the garden looks alive.
Tuesday Trust should remember you are giving hope in a country were
there is little hope. For this I thank you for your continued support
to Malawi. Please never forget you do make a difference. For this we
are grateful.
Wishing you all a fab Christmas.
Hugs and Thanks a million

Lynn and ALK en route to Malawi

The 10 Most Important Facts About Education in Malawi

October 15th, 2018

education_in_malawi-530×375.jpg

Malawi has been ranked as one of the lowest-performing nations for literacy in sub-Saharan Africa. Malawi is one of the least developed countries in the world and education is proven as one of the critical pathways to improving living conditions in the country. Here are 10 facts regarding education in Malawi:

Experts believe that education is the driving force to alleviating poverty in Malawi and that it can help the country move toward development. With greater government involvement and international organisations supporting the nation, education in Malawi has the potential to improve in coming years.

Hunger Stunts Learning

September 26th, 2018

The impact of hunger on education systems is gravely underreported. Being severely malnourished, to the point it impacts on brain development, can be the same as losing four grades of schooling. Around 171 million children in developing countries are stunted by hunger by the time they reach age 5. Stunting can affect a child’s cognitive abilities as well as their focus and concentration in school. As a result, stunted children are 19% less likely to be able to read by age eight. Conversely, good nutrition can be crucial preparation for good learning.

Our Schools Growing initiative teaches children about how to grow their own food and supports and encourages them growing vegetable gardens at their schools. TT’s project support assistant, Aubrey with a school groupPreparing lunch at school

The Passing of a Dear Friend

April 23rd, 2018

A dear friend to us, Eva, died on Friday, April 13th 2018. We were Malawi friends. She was tiny, tiny, fierce and funny with an eye for a colourful dress. She also had the eye of a tiger on a mission.. taking care of all her grandchildren.Tough going in the relentlessness grind of poverty… Working as a General Assistant in Ndi Moyo Clinic was very important to Eva. She loved them. They loved her. They were all family.

I never saw her cry, I never heard her shout. Is this the way God made Malawian women or was it just her?

I only went to her house once. To bring her deceased baby granddaughter back home to be buried.

I saw her two weeks ago. Frail and tired but beautiful and still laughing.

I will miss her every time I go back to Ndi Moyo. I miss her now. We will all miss her.

Eva RIP

ALK

eva-collage.jpg

Patient Support Group Gardening

March 16th, 2018

The overall situation in Malawi is challenging to say the least. Inflation is being driven by a collapsing currency that has fallen in value by 80% in a decade. So every win is amplified.

Our Patient Support Group Garden at Ndi Moyo Palliative Care Trust is flourishing, with a bumper cassava crop right now. We supply their seeds and tools, and have given them 16 weeks of training, with practical growing skills that they can also use at their homes to help feed themselves. We also give them breakfast every Friday. Of course, the Group are all terribly ill, with many suffering from cervical cancer and all are HIV+. The Garden benefits at a community and nutritional. Small steps, big returns at a people level.Patient Support Group, Ndi Moyo

Lynn Clifford on Irish radio programme

October 30th, 2017

There was a great item on Lynn Clifford from WAG on Mooney Goes Wild, a radio programme on RTÉ, Ireland’s national broadcaster.

Find more about it here.

“Irish Woman Lynn Clifford, Conservationist In Malawi
To a subject we’ve covered on this show many times before and that’s the illegal wildlife trade. It’s the fourth most lucrative transnational crime after drugs, arms, and human trafficking, and it’s threatening some of the world’s most iconic species with extinction.

About two hours drive east of Malawi’s capital city, Lilongwe, close to that natural wonder, Lake Malawi, lies the Thuma Forest reserve one of the few reserves in the country which is still home to elephants and buffalo, as well as many other species, including a variety of birds, insects, trees and plants.

Deep within that forest, some several kilometres along a dirt road, lies a base camp for conservationists. They’re called the ‘Wildlife Action Group’ and their director just happens to be an Irish woman.

Lynn Clifford is originally from Swords in County Dublin and, on a recent visit to her family in Ireland, she met with Richard Collins at his home in Malahide.”
Lynn with Baby Elephant

Big Thanks to Bruce and Marianne

July 23rd, 2017

Marianne and Bruce Johnson

Big thanks to Marianne and Bruce Johnson who have been so generous and supportive towards Tuesday Trust. Bruce, being such a keen gardener and grower, has given us barrowloads of tools for our gardeners in Malawi.

Love and thanks.

Lynn meets the TA and Chiefs

June 18th, 2017

Lynn Clifford, our amazing manager and WAG CEO recently met local chiefs to discuss all matters relating to our projects, world climate change and welfare for their villages.

Lynn Clifford meeting local chiefs

Lucy Finch on BBC’s 100 Women of 2016 List

December 1st, 2016

Inspirational Lucy Finch, our great friend and founder of Ndi Moyo Palliative Care in Malawi has been named on BBC’s list of 100 Women of 2016. The list covers inspirational and influential women responsible for all manner of extraordinary achievements from groundbreaking moments of defiance to new takes on fairy tales, stories of octogenarian cheerleading to inside the world of e-gaming. And of course, Lucy - and her remarkable story of vision, energy and above all, compassion. Lucy Finch on BBC

As the piece introduces her: “Malawi is one of the world’s least developed countries with very primitive health care. In March 1998, nurse Lucy Finch had visited her native Malawi to care for her sister who was dying of Aids, when hearing a young man’s agonising death made her decide to come back and set up Malawi’s first and only hospice.”

We are delighted to have had the opportunity to work with and support Lucy and her husband, Tony’s work at Ndi Moyo for several years now; and they’ve been amazing supportive of Tuesday Trust projects. So our congratulations to Lucy - we send her our love and best wishes. The BBC has chosen very well.

BBC 100 Women 2016

A little really does go a long way

June 1st, 2016

Something as simple as a watering can or a little extra know-how about preparing the soil can make a world of difference. A little goes a long way. So big thanks to all our sponsors and donors for kindly supporting this work.

Watering at Chimutu