Archive for ‘Education’


Releasing True Girl Power

December 9th, 2019

Investing in Girls’ Education - a report

This World Bank report is a year old, but the lessons are still the same. Keeping girls in school brings benefits far beyond the intrinsic value of education.

- In Malawi, nearly four in 10 girls marry before the age of 18, and three in 10 girls have their first child before the age of 18.

- Early marriage and childbearing before age 18 and the resultant population growth are negatively impacting Malawi’s development

- Ending child marriage could generate half a billion dollars annually for Malawi in the next decade

Educating girls, ending child marriage, and preventing early childbearing are all essential to ensure that girls have agency, not only as future wives and mothers, but also as productive citizens in a wide range of roles. These are also enablers for countries to achieve their full development potential, which requires the full participation of all citizens to the degree to which they are capable. This is why the Tuesday Trust has always had a particular focus on trying to encourage and support girls in rural Malawi to stay in education as long as they possibly can. It’s empowering and game-changing.

World Bank Malawi Economic Monitor

The full report can be downloaded here from the Malawi Economic Monitor (MEM) which provides an analysis of economic and structural development issues in Malawi.

WFP Malawi and USDA Building Schools

October 1st, 2019

This is the sort of positive initiative from WFP that gives Malawi a long term chance. Education really is the key if Malawians are to have hope.

United Nations World Food Programme in Malawi is providing schoolmeals in primary schools and building secondary schools in rural areas to give these children a chance to continue their education. In association with USDA.

See video here.

WFP Malawi programme

ALK on the Schools Run

May 9th, 2019

ALK on the Schools Run

The redoubtable Anne-Louise Kelly was back in Malawi last month checking in on the schools in our Food Growing Project with WAG. Despite all their travails, their daily struggles against poverty and hunger, the children were as upbeat as ever. Humanity burns strongly in these kids who deserve the chance for a better life. Here are some great smiles from Kambiri, Namachete and Kavunguti schools.

TT/WAG Schools Project

TT/WAG Schools Project

TT/WAG Schools Project

Gender-Based Violence and Female Empowerment in Malawi

January 31st, 2019

“Unfortunately, gender-based violence remains a serious development challenge in Malawi. Women and girls in Malawi fare worse than their male counterparts on socio-economic indicators including literacy, secondary and tertiary education enrolment and completion, wage equality, political participation, and literacy. Despite their critical role in food production for their households, Malawian women have little control over land, even when it is their own.” - USAID

This is one of the key drivers for our mission, to give children the skills to grow themselves, to help help women feed themselves and their families, and to facilitate access to land. And it’s why The Tuesday Trust strongly believes in supporting girls staying longer in education.

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How to Change the Story for Girls

January 28th, 2019

Despite heroines like Chief Theresa Kachindamoto, too many young girls, many only 12 or 13 years old find themselves being “married” off and are quickly pregnant. Malawi has one of the highest rates of child marriage in the world. It’s starting to change. The govt. is intervening, but it needs to be addressed at village level. Girls need to feel protected, nurtured and empowered as early as possible. So it was wonderful to find this pupil poster in one of the schools we support for our TT growing project, Namachete. Here’s a powerful manifesto to start changing that story.

Poster at Namachete school

Rates of Child Marriage Malawi

See more at Girls Not Brides.

Schooling in Malawi: a vicious circle

November 27th, 2018

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Interesting, though challenging piece looking at the schooling stats here from a Scottish educationalist, Elizabeth Ritchie who has worked extensively in Malawi. She paints a stark picture of the challenges.

One of the key figures quoted in the headlines is that less than half of pupils in Malawi’s primary schools complete the full eight years of basic education. However, the total might be even less than that. In desperately poor schools in rural areas, the completion rate might well be in the region of 30%, but is balanced out nationally by the completion rate in the better private schools and in urban government schools.

What is worrying, however, is that the completion rate is falling. It was 52% in 2013. While everyone agrees that the EMIS figures are shocking, some researchers even so do not consider them to be accurate. Analysis by Chancellor College, University of Malawi, suggests that the overall primary completion rate is actually less than 30%.

Most children drop out of school between Standard 1 and Standard 2 when classes are at their largest. Furthermore, it is not just completion which is a problem. Many children repeat classes, sometimes year after year: almost 22% across the country. Pupils who repeat, don’t move on. They rarely learn much more as the problems which have damaged their education remain. They are stuck, educationally, socially and intellectually.

It is a vicious circle. High class sizes at the early stages of primary school contribute to dropout. Drop out results in too few pupils entering secondary school. Too few secondary pupils result in too few trainee teachers which, in turn, means a pupil-teacher ratio which is too high.

The government is prioritising the building of CDSSs. However, in order to develop secondary education, which is essential for national development, it will have to divert resources from already under-resourced primary schools. These are the kinds of decisions which developing nations make all the time.

The data in this post may seem overwhelming in its significance for the long term development of Malawi. However, change is possible. Improvements happen – think of the strides made by countries like Ghana, for example. Such improvements depend on careful prioritisation and planning and for these accurate data is needed. Depressing though the data may look, the important thing is that at least it is now being gathered and reported. Let us hope that it will now be used and acted on.

More here

The 10 Most Important Facts About Education in Malawi

October 15th, 2018

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Malawi has been ranked as one of the lowest-performing nations for literacy in sub-Saharan Africa. Malawi is one of the least developed countries in the world and education is proven as one of the critical pathways to improving living conditions in the country. Here are 10 facts regarding education in Malawi:

Experts believe that education is the driving force to alleviating poverty in Malawi and that it can help the country move toward development. With greater government involvement and international organisations supporting the nation, education in Malawi has the potential to improve in coming years.

Hunger Stunts Learning

September 26th, 2018

The impact of hunger on education systems is gravely underreported. Being severely malnourished, to the point it impacts on brain development, can be the same as losing four grades of schooling. Around 171 million children in developing countries are stunted by hunger by the time they reach age 5. Stunting can affect a child’s cognitive abilities as well as their focus and concentration in school. As a result, stunted children are 19% less likely to be able to read by age eight. Conversely, good nutrition can be crucial preparation for good learning.

Our Schools Growing initiative teaches children about how to grow their own food and supports and encourages them growing vegetable gardens at their schools. TT’s project support assistant, Aubrey with a school groupPreparing lunch at school

Today is International Day of the Girl

October 11th, 2017

Today is International Day of the Girl. We strongly support the ambition of UN Women: “On the International Day of the Girl Child, let us commit to investing in skills training and education for girls and livelihood activities for young women around the world who are facing crises. Far from being passive recipients of assistance, these girls are leaders who will use the skills that they develop today to rebuild their communities, and create a better future for all of us.

International Day of the Girl

Girl Power: Getting them back into school

September 26th, 2017

Although the number of out-of-school girls has declined by 52 million since 2000, 63 million girls are still not in school today. According to the most recent UNESCO Institute of Statistics data, girls are twice as likely as boys never to enrol in school.

Barriers to girls’ education are complex and multifaceted. In addition to unfavourable school environments, they can include discriminatory social and cultural factors, early marriage and school-related violence.

There are huge advantages to a society to having more girls go through school, it’s much beyond the macro benefit. The child of a mother who can read is 50% more likely to live past 5 years. Fascinating infographic here which is both horrifying and a source of hope: http://www.globalpartnership.org/blog/breaking-down-barriers-girls-education.

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